Tiesiai iš jachtų - spalio 22, 2014

"Doldrums"... Mažai ar visiškai be vėjo. Vieni stengiasi pailsėti prieš artėjančią etapo dalį, kai tam laiko nebebus, kiti remontuoja sulūžusias detales, treti tiesiog laukia stebuklo.

Team SCA

You know when you try to stick two positive magnets together and regardless as to how close you get them they never touch? Well, the ITCZ is a bit like that. The ITCZ is formed per result of the northerly trade winds and the southerly trade winds meeting. It is the “zone” between the trades—about 3-5 degrees wide—where energy and wind go ‘up.’ With everything going up, thunderstorms are formed, and then you have light and shifty winds on the surface.

The most important thing for us to do is watch the clouds and watch the radar—to make sure we’re on the course that not only allows us to go around the storms but also allows us to move forward.

Corinna Halloran, OBR
Team SCA
Go to team website 

Team Alvimedica

The synopsis is pretty straightforward: we are stuck in the Doldrums. Stuck, and stuck real good.

The reality is that it could have been worse. We think we’ve done everything possible--played the cards we were dealt with relative success. But you know before coming in here, to the Doldrums, that you’re kind of at its mercy and unfortunately it’s not being kind.

It’s back to the radar screen in search of a way out!

Amory Ross, OBR
Team Alvimedica
Go to team website 

Team Vestas Wind

The only thing on anyones mind right now is are we close to being out of these Doldrums, Wouter expects another 24hrs we will be clear, we all hope its sooner. The heat is becoming unbearable also. The sweat drips from my face now, failing vertically like the amazon delta past my stomach where it finally greets the edge of my shorts to be collected and wrung dry daily. I’m not sure what the actual temperature is but its hot enough for all our chocolate to melt.

It hurts, especially knowing the other boats were polling 20+ miles on us every six hour report. We were busy though - our outrigger/reaching strut snapped on the outer end where the most support is. It’s rather baffling how it happened. 12 knots of wind a mast head zero at 115 true wind angle. Rob Salthouse spent 4-5 hours repairing and strengthening the remainder. A couple of hours later, the resin was set and a new strut was born.

Brian Carlin, OBR
Team Vestas Wind
Go to team website 

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing

Onboard, it has been a constant waltz as all the members of ADOR have taken full advantage of this time to rest; prepping for the drag race that’s sure to start.

The watch system has been rotating efficiently and it seems for the first time, there are always 4 people sound asleep down below or up on top of the sail stack. Whispering has become the new rule. Even during tacking maneuvers, we are trying to keep at least 2 to 3 people in the rack so as to maximize the resting.

As I write, the wind has starting to build again. 8 kts of boat speed. This could be the build Ian talked about…or we might take two steps back again.

Matt Knighton, OBR
Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing
Go to team website 

Dongfeng Race Team

The Danish gust. Ain’t much fun being stuck, but it’s even more annoying when you’re racing. And when you look at the positions, you see boats who are in theory in a worst place, and doing well anyway – that’s annoying. 

Welcome to the sauna. It’s not always easy finding sleep in these conditions. And guess what, one thing that doesn’t help is the temperature inside the boat. Imagine a small living space, with very little air movement, in which you find five people, computers, an engine, a kitchen…. I’ve noted 31 degrees half an hour ago, in the middle of the night.

Yann Riou, OBR

Dongfeng Race Team
Go to team website

 

MAPFRE

We've been in the same place for 24 hours. Xabi says “this is exasperating and the only thing you can expect is for another team to be in a worst situation than you.” I doubt it, and we might still not be in the Doldrums yet. Stuck, with no wind, and the worst heat I’ve ever experienced. 8º North - that’s our latitude. I’m sure I’ll never forget it in my whole life.

Some guys washed, repaired things, cleaned up….Ñeti was the luckiest, he jumped in the water if only one minute.

Francisco Vignale, OBR
MAPFRE
Go to team website